Catch Your Breath exhibition

Stop where you are and take a deep breath.How does it feel?What does it make you think?How many breaths have…

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Dust to dust (McGuire, 2019)

Black lung is a disease often relegated to the domain of the history book. But can historical research tell us…

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‘Race Correction’ in Medicine: A History of Lung Function Measurements

The Life of Breath project was delighted to host Professor Lundy Braun in Bristol recently to speak at our bi-annual…

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Listening to the past

How do we ​accurately ​measure hearing loss? In a new paper in The British Journal for the History of Science, Life of Breath researcher…

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Medievalism and the Medical Humanities

Some may wonder why our project includes the consideration of medieval thoughts and practices relating to the breath. What can…

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The uses and abuses of air (1)

The header shows Ascent of Lunardi’s Balloon from St George’s Fields, London, 1788-90 by J. C. Ibbetson, which will be…

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Restoring Breath: Questions, medical advancements and the importance of bystander participation

Tina Williams, PhD student on the Life of Breath project, writes a post prompted by the inaugural lecture of Prof….

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Affective Reading: Chaucer, Women, and Romance

Understanding how thoughts and feelings can affect the body is a key strand of our research. Here, team member Corinne Saunders explores how the interaction…

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Making the invisible visible (2)

Rebecca Oxley, post-doctoral research fellow on the Life of Breath project, writes about the recent project launch in Durham (see…

Way up high

Jess Farr-Cox (Project Manager, Bristol) writes: Our recent official launch of the project was in many ways a model of…

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